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20121201
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." andrea, chime in here. despite a dramatic appearance from 89-year-old former senator bob dole, the senate failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wou
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
restrictions ends your virginity. you are the enemy. your thoughts? >> well, it's great that bob casey has come out for these things, but if all that happens at the end of the day is that we have a ban on a certain type of weapon or a certain type of magazine with a certain type of capacity, 100 bullets, let's say, we'll have failed here. you know, it's not just about the guns. it's how people get guns. what people have to do in order to get guns. we should be treating these more like automobile licenses. you should have to prove you know how to use these things. you should prove you understand the law around the use of guns and things like that. if we start talking about that, then we'll be realistic. i think what's happening now for a lot of these politicians is we've had this moment here in our culture which is pretty horrific, and they're running for the hills a little bit, running scared, so they're going to look for something they can do that is maybe better than nothing but largely cosmetic. just like the assault weapons ban was largely cosmetic. >> give me a ron reagan gun bill. >> a ro
by bob casey. >> he's not the only one. joe manchin, the senator from west virginia, on monday was saying this has changed his thinking. of course, these are two democrats -- >> but manchin hasn't said he will vote for these two bills. bobby casey said he will. it's different to have conversations, another to make a commitment. >> i think there will be more and more lawmakers who will follow what casey has done. i don't think he's the only one, and i think we'll start seeing some republicans -- >> it's the toughest case. let me go to ron reagan. i know pennsylvania defeated years ago joe clark, a great liberal senator, on this issue. first guy i ever voted for actually. now it's back. i know the people on the gun side of the argument, i know them closely. they will be out there vigilantly looking for any traitor they find, anybody who dares to vote for any kind of restriction, and any restrictions ends your virginity. you are the enemy. your thoughts? >> well, it's great that bob casey has come out for these things, but if all that happens at the end of the day is that we have a ban on a
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
-- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should have showed. >> two of them have been close. people forget that the vietnam caucus, as strained as things have gotten in washington. >> they worked hard on that. >> what remains of it. >> with kerry and jack reed and the guys that are left, they're all -- they all look out for each other. >> where do you think
] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the sufferers, the persecutors under communism to subject ourselves? why leave it to these? but there it was. i'm fairly relaxed about the communism symbols. you see a guy with a cccp sweatshirt and his trinkets. i did a study of this, a simple magazine piece, and, you know, t
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, w
bob corker is involved with one of those. we'll play that for everybody in a little while. the big question after this, where does this investigation go. >> reporter: there are at least four tracks to this investigation. this is really the beginning of the second chapter. first and foremost is the testimony from secretary clinton expected now in the middle of january because only she can address this missing policy piece. why it was that we had this limited security footprint on the ground when it showed this rising threat from al qaeda and these other islamist groups? second is this justice department or criminal investigation. we heard from the head of the house intelligence committee yesterday, my knowledge rogers, that investigation is essentially nowhere. the third piece is the size, the depth and breadth of the cia operation and the fourth and perhaps foremost, are the quality of these warnings that our reporting at fox we were able to show there was an emergency meeting in benghazi one month before the attack that was passed on to headquarters here in washington and they act
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
was senator bob corker. here is what he had to say. [video clip] >> realizing that we do not have a lot of cards when it comes to the tax issue before the end of the year. it will leave the presidency and the senate in the hands of the democrats. many people are putting forward a theory that has merit where you go against the president with a 2% increase on the top 2%. all of a sudden the shift goes back to entitlements. all of a sudden once you give him that tax rate, lesser that what he has been talking about, the focus shifts to entitlements and puts us in a place where we can actually do something to save this nation. i am actually beginning to believe that that is the best route for us to take. host: senator corker, saying that there are more republicans willing to do that. you heard him lay out the strategy there. lots of debate in washington about who should give and how much. we are asking you to weigh in on that conversation and tell us what you are willing to sacrifice. this comes from a piece from a few days ago, from "national journal magazine." it is about americans not wil
, bob. we did. got it. >>> well, washington's division and dysfunction threatened our economic recovery, some american cities are working their way back after decades of tough times. recently, i traveled to youngstown, ohio, and caught a glimpse of hope deep in the rust belt. >> this is your father's first restaurant? >> the first one. >> what street was it, do you remember? >> wick avenue. >> wick avenue. >> my grandmother's lived in youngstown, ohio, for more than 95 years. >> yes, i've seen it in many different phases. my grandfather came here from greece. he opened a restaurant, the american dream. >> but he taught himself english. he taught himself to read the newspaper, and he became a very successful businessman. as he would say, only in america. youngstown was prosperous, and downtown youngstown was really prosperous. it was wonderful to go to downtown youngstown and be all dressed up in gloves and hat and going in and out of the shops and having lunch downtown. it was exciting. >> but that prosperity didn't last. youngstown ohio was the manufacturing backbone of this country bu
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
on. >> because of what bob's saying is they're worried some voters are going to look at that -- >> unaware of reality that they would confuse this week with next week in terms of the same results. >> governor norquist agrees with you. but some republicans e spshlly in the house who are unwilling to make the plan "b" type deal. >> but in the end where do you think it's going to end up? 500,000? 600,000 $? >> it's going to be in the middle. closer to obama's $400,000. >> i think that's about right. sounds about like $400,000. >> which leaves out less than 2% of the people. >> absolutely. >> people say that's an average income. most people make about $40,000 a year. that's average. $40,000 and that's with three or four kids too. >> there's only a couple places in the country somebody would look at $400,000 and think it's extremely wealthy. >> even in washington, d.c. if you make $400,000 for a couple you're rich. >> this weekend the president's been a tough negotiator. as you said with republicans. i think he's been tough. the general reports about one meeting with boehn
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
with bob bell who runs the north pole express. >> it's something that just goes with christmas. it goes with the holidays. i don't know what i would do without them. >> reporter: and keeping those bells ringing for generations to come. suzanne candiotti, east hampton, connecticut. >>> and cnn newsroom continues for deb who
the same thing from bob king from the united auto workers yesterday, giving same lack of specifics. only broad concepts they're looking to challenge right to work laws in court. they will go after the speed which the laws moved through the legislature. democrats and union political machines will go after republicans in elections in 2014. they are looking to change the majority that the gop holds in both the senate and the house here in michigan. and they're looking to prove that theory. once you go after organized labor that is like kicking hornet's nest. we see the democratic leadership in meets, not telling what is going on in the meetings, only promising this is not the end of this fight, jenna. jenna: hornet's nest indeed. mike tobin covering the breaking details over the last several days for us. meantime congressman levin will join us later on this hour. he is a democrat from michigan. he has been the at forefront of labor issues in that state since the 1960s. he is obviously against what happened in the state government. we'll talk to him a little bit what is next and what does it
there is duplication. there are clearly areas where we can provide greater efficiencies. we were able, bob gates before me begin that effort. we have added about $60 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we will continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. i ask that question when i first became secretary. what is the role of the service secretary visa be the service chief? the reality is that there is an important role for them. they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. the also have to negotiate a lot of the politics. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> at the defense department deals with downsizing services, have you considered cuts to the number of flight in general officers? >> i think that is part and parcel. as you do force reduction, we will be reducing the structure and i think as that happens, they have to review not just the reductions in our troops but also th
the fiscal cliff. senator bob corker also spoke to reporters. >> good morning. i am lamar alexander. this is my colleague bob corker. merry christmas to you three points to make and then i would like to introduce cementer corker. here is the first point. when the dust settles and everything is said and done, federal individual income taxes are not going to go up on almost all americans next year. that needs to be settled this weekend by the votes and after the first of the year, so that's the most important point for americans to know. for almost all americans when the dust settles taxes, individual income taxes won't be going up next year. all the talk is about taxes but what we should talk about today is the medicare fiscal clef, the looming bankruptcy in the program that seniors depend upon to pay the medical bills for the millions of americans who are counting the days until they are eligible for medicare so they can afford the medicare bill, it would be a tragedy if when they get to that day there isn't enough money to pay the bills but according to the medicare trustees that d
to the top republicans since 1986, serving republican leader bob michael, newt gingrich, speaker hastert and john boehner and floor assistant as the general clerk for republican leader john rose and assist ant manager for the republican cloakroom. his experience has been invaluable to all of us who serve here in the house of representatives. jay is known for his vast knowledge of the rules, for his vast knowledge of the traditions and history and the procedures of the house of representatives. and he has been a teacher and a coach to so many members of the congress over the years and we're grateful to his dedication and that he has given this institution over the past 34 years. jay was born in santa barbara, california and graduated from westmont college. jay has a master's degree and pd in english literature. he and his wife have two grown sons, joel and jay. jay is a man of faith and he has his party in the right place. several years ago, he said politics must be secondary to faith and to life. ultimate answers don't lie in politic. no matter what we do or legislate, we won't solve the
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
they took him to in michigan, senator inknew -- senator ininouye, two phones, bob dole, and the republican nominee for president of the united states, and this other lifetime friend is senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate,, a massive senate office building named after him. senator said in his usual calm manner, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. congressional gold medal. highest honor congress can bestow, the distinguished service cross, bronze star for valor, and of course, a purple hurt. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress as he displayed on the battle field. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting i had -- i mentioned it briefly last night, but it was ten days. i knew that senator inouye was not feeling well, so i went down to his office, and he has a remarkable office. it's a beautiful office. but there isn't one single frame on the wall depicting what great man he is. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his
efficiency. so we were able, bob teets before me begin that effort, achieved about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to reveal for greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now i ask that question when i first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary vis-À-vis the service chief? the reality is there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there's an important role for them to play in terms of a particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> as the defense department does the downsizing services committee consider cuts to the number flag and general officers? >> again, i think that's part and parcel as he do force reduction. as i said, we are going to be reducing the force structure in the army to 490,000. the reduced the marines as well and i
, one of our friends, peter johnson, jr. >> the andy williams show, the king family, the osmonds, bob hope, their christmas special, has nothing on "fox & friends." billy ray cyrus, paula deen, steve doocy challenging bill o'reilly, you guys. i mean, it's a fantastic show. i had a little bit of a preview. let's take a hook now what you'll see tonight and tomorrow. >> here is billy ray cyrus. >> made a lot of noise with that. >> queen of southern cuisine is laughing already. >> she's here to dish what christmas is like at her house. you gave us a real idea of what's happening. >> you look like you've been drinking egg nog. >> you have not aged at all. >> what do you make on christmas morning? >> christmas morning, casserole. >> oh, my gosh. scared me to death. can't waste the butter. ♪ all i want for christmas is a rock'n'roll electric guitar. ♪ i'm offering this simple prayer ♪ ♪ to kids from one to 92 >> youtube sensation. >> the piano guy. ♪ . >> ho, ho, ho! ho, ho, ho! merry christmas! ♪ to you ♪ . >> the back story, is i was supposed to do a duet with ashanti, but my
take responsibility for it. i can remember bob michael former republican leader in the house saying i'm proud of voting for this. if you want a two bit congressman vote for somebody else. he kept getting reelected. host: john now on the democratic line. caller: good morning. thanks for having me on. my main thing is saying i think the problem is our g.d.p. we don't produce anything. we don't create any jobs. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the countr
communicators." >> we just saw pennsylvania senator bob casey. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
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